Visualizing beyond awesomeness….

X-rays are nice and all, but V-ray… V-ray breaks the barrier between what’s real and what’s in our imagination… wait, rather.. what’s beyond our imagination. We’re taking it to the next level of awesome cuz we’re now resellers of this amazing power! And… wow. We’re talking speed, precision, power, … power… wow, just holy moly wow. Take a look at their 2011 demo reel for some awesomeness. The official ‘press release’ is here, but I’m sure you’re more interested in what v-ray is capable of. Check it out:

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Making the WAN as fast as the LAN

I get a common question on how to make users from multiple offices share the same drawings seamlessly. They want to be able to work on files stored in New York while working from Seattle just as they were in the New York office. In the realm of WAN optimization, the biggest player is Riverbed Steelhead. Autodesk works directly with Riverbed and many firms already have it in place, but it’s important to know what actually happens.

The appliance takes data across the wire and caches it, sending only bits that haven’t been sent (incremental changes). The first 5MB file you send will take 1 minute (cold). If someone requests the same file later, that transfer will take 10-20 seconds (warm). The older DWG file format (2007 and older), along with older Autodesk software, does the full file swap when saving, negating any benefit from appliance.

Solution?

  1. Change the “Incremental Save Percentage” (ISP) inside AutoCAD to 50.
  2. Use the 2010 DWG format!
    • Why? The 2007 DWG format are not optimized. When you do every open/save, all the bits inside it are rearranged, data de-duplication technologies can’t recognize them, and the entire file looks new to Riverbed’s data hashing algorithms.
    • 2007 is sooooo 2007. Last time I checked, it is not 2007 anymore.

Another interesting tidbit is that if you analyze the data from your Steelhead, besides AutoCAD files being optimized, a lot of the benefit comes from other things are being optimized. You’d be surprised how chatty software is.

Automate ALL the things!

Just came back from a client visit and the project this time was helping to upgrade their license server. Pretty straight forward stuff, but I’ve come to realize that what I do as “straight forward” is actually pretty impressive to quite a few people.

We all know [at least you should if you follow my blog] that there are three spots that Autodesk uses to define where the license servers are.

  • Environment variables
  • Registry Entries
  • LICPATH.LIC

These are read that in that order, and when the system finds the key (ADSK_LICENSE_FILE), it will stop and put it to memory. So how does it affect my deployment? Well, if you have a license server (let’s call it OldLic1 and OldLic2) already serving up licenses and you want to upgrade/retire it and move licenses to your new, awesomely robust virtual server (NewLic1 and NewLic2), most people think you need to touch every workstation to update those values so that AutoCAD and Revit will get license from the right servers. NOT!

With the all-powerful Group Policy Management Editor and some nifty GPOs, you can make the change to all your workstations to all your branches… at once. Yes, we did this to well over a thousand machines for this project, even to their branches, WITHOUT having to touch every single machine. Thank goodness too, cuz I would’ve gone crazy!

Wait,… what? What GPOs do I need, you ask? I dropped enough clues; I’ll let your IT group figure that one out